null
Industrial hemp: you may be surprised by all the ways it’s used today

Industrial hemp: you may be surprised by all the ways it’s used today

Posted by Rose on 1st Mar 2022

As a hemp clothing maker, it’s gratifying to see how this amazing fiber has staged a comeback far beyond sustainable fashion.

Although my focus is on making women’s hemp clothing, I never cease to be surprised by all the ways that this versatile plant is used. Today, you’ll find industrial hemp in a head-spinning array of products. Clothes, food, paper, textiles, plastics, insulation and biofuel are all made with hemp and the oil from its seeds. 

womens hemp Tencel topswomens hemp Tencel skirtswomens hemp - Tencel pants

A stroll down the aisles of your local health food store or co-op should turn up plenty of food and cosmetic items touting hemp as a key ingredient. While hemp for CBD has received a lot of press lately, many health care professionals have long recommended hemp seed oil for its healthy dose of omega-3 acids that benefit cardiovascular health.

Industrial hemp makes great clothing!

The 55% hemp content in the Trapeze Tunic and Cropped Pants ensures they’ll provide many years of wear.

When it comes to textiles, though, hemp’s been on hand a long time. We’ve been cultivating industrial hemp for 10 millennia and are still discovering new uses for this Earth-friendly crop. Our ancestors were won over by hemp’s prodigious growth rate and resistance to pests. Compared to cotton, hemp wins easily in the eco-friendly clothing category. Conventional cotton is soaked in toxic pesticides and herbicides and is raised with synthetic fertilizers while consuming prodigious amounts of water. By contrast, hemp for fiber is for the most part grown without these chemical inputs and improves the soil. This latter benefit is the result of hemp crops aerating soil and returning nutrients to soil.

womens hemp Tencel topswomens hemp Tencel skirtswomens hemp - Tencel pants

Hemp garments have been found in ancient Egyptian tombs. In fact, “canvas” derives its name from “cannabis." The tall ships that made world trade possible depended on incredibly rugged hemp canvas for their massive sails. But let’s face it, nobody wants to wear sail cloth!

Reducing yarn size and blending industrial hemp with other fibers such as silk, flax, cotton or Tencel results in fabrics that are softer, less wrinkly and cost less. Sympatico’s fabrics are a case in point. The Tencel, which is grown and processed in an earth-friendly closed loop system, adds a beautiful sheen as well as drape and softness to the hemp fiber.

Hemp takes dyes brilliantly and offers no-fuss, easy care.

The hemp and Tencel blend used in the popular Tuxedo Top takes dyes brilliantly and offers no-fuss, easy care.

Sympatico's hemp/Tencel blend makes environmental sense too. Tencel, like hemp, is grown without chemical fertilizers or pesticides, and it is an ideal fiber to blend with industrial hemp. You can find out more about how hemp helps the Earth while contributing to a fashionable wardrobe here

Related: Hemp/Tencel women’s clothes: Earth-friendly 7-day wearability

More: Hemp clothes and humans: a 10-millennia epi

Share: